Six Dogs ’til Sunday, by Lia Farrell: A Shooting Sheds New Light on Past Events

six_dogsSix Dogs ’til Sunday ($15.95, 256 pages, ISBN: 978-1-60381-250-4) is the sixth and final cozy mystery by Lia Farrell in a series featuring Mae December, the successful owner of a dog-boarding business in Rosedale, Tennessee, her sheriff fiancé and his staff, and her friends and family. The shooting of a man in an old house being used as a movie set casts new light on past cases investigated by the Rosedale Sheriff’s Office.

** Click the cover image to order online **

** Or buy it for your Kindle, Nook, or in other digital formats from Smashwords **

It’s January in Rosedale, Tennessee, and Mae December is preparing for her March wedding to Sheriff Ben Bradley. Mae, who boards dogs for a living, is also busy tending to her pregnant dog and scouting locations for the movie featuring the music of her former fiancé Noah West, who died in a car accident four years earlier. Fortunately the picturesque old house at the end of Little Chapel Road is for rent.

Just as filming is about to begin, a man is shot on the set, but manages to drive himself to the hospital, where he dies before he can ID his killer. He was a member of the film crew, but also a local, and circumstances point to his being a confidential informant for Ben’s predecessor, Sheriff Trey Cantrell, also the owner of the house turned movie set. At the time of the shooting, the victim had been stealing a large sum of money from a safe on the premises. Whose money is it, and where does it come from?

The Rosedale Sheriff’s Office not only has another murder case on its hands, but one that will dredge up a past long buried. How far will the guilty parties go to protect their secrets?

The first five books in the Mae December Mystery series, One Dog Too Many, Two Dogs Lie Sleeping, Three Dog Day, Four Dog’s Sake, and Five Dog Voodoo have been enthusiastically received by readers and critics:

Five Dog Voodoo: “The story was clean, the dialogue nice and tight, with an ending that leaves one as satisfied and happy as a recently fed puppy!” —InD’Tale Magazine

Four Dog’s Sake: “There is a lot of action in this book, and the author gives a wonderful view of the motivation of a real killer. This is one fast-paced cozy that keeps you on your toes.”
—Suspense magazine

Three Dog Day: “A wonderful cozy mystery, and a great addition to a lovely series. It is sure to offer a lot of entertainment for mystery fans.” —Long and Short Reviews

Two Dogs Lie Sleeping: “Another fantastic whodunit from Lia Farrell. This series is now one of my firm favorites.” —Cozy Mystery Book Reviews

One Dog Too Many: “A lively tale with plenty of twists, turns, and unexpected situations to satisfy the most ardent cozy mystery lover.” —Fresh Fiction

Lia Farrell is the pen name of the mother and daughter writing team of Lyn Farquhar and Lisa Fitzsimmons, who live in Michigan and Tennessee, respectively. Both are life-long readers who are also dog lovers. Lyn owns a Welsh corgi and Lisa has a Siberian husky. Lisa works as a Muralist and Interior Designer and Lyn is a Professor Emerita of Medical Education who has retired to write full-time. For more information, click here.

Says Lyn, “Finishing Six Dogs ’til Sunday was bittersweet. There is always a moment when we feel relieved to have a book behind us, but that is quickly followed by a sense of satisfaction, even pleasure. This time, though, we are saying goodbye to characters who are almost members of the family. As we wish Mae, Ben, Wayne and Dory farewell, we hope our readers will remember them as fondly as we do.”

Keep reading for an excerpt:

After Connie left to retrieve her children, Ben moved to the opposite sofa, facing Mae. “You’re quiet today,” he said, cocking his head and narrowing his blue eyes. “You okay?”

She busied herself with spreading the napkin across her lap and glancing through the menu. “I’m fine. Do you want to share a salad and one of the pizzas?”

“That sounds perfect.” He paused. “But you don’t.”

Mae looked across the table at him. “I don’t what?”

“Sound perfect. Or even good, for that matter. And I may not be the world’s best fiancé, but even I know to worry when you say I’m fine. Do you want to talk about it?”

Mae put down her menu, blinked back tears, and cleared her throat. “Did I ever tell you that Noah was friends with the guys who used to rent that old house?”

The waiter appeared beside Ben, who quickly ordered the Margherita pizza with prosciutto added and a Caesar salad. After the waiter’s departure, he shook his head. “I don’t think you mentioned it.”

“A couple of wannabe musicians rented it then. Noah used to go over there, and they’d try out new songs, play some old stuff—just hang out. My uncle went along sometimes. I did too, now and then.”

“Not too often, I hope.” Ben frowned. “That place has a bad reputation.”

Mae was startled. “The last time I was there was a few months before Noah died. I never heard anything bad about the house, though. What do you mean?”

“I heard rumors about drug dealing.” Ben gave her a serious look. “Trey Cantrell used to own it. I don’t know if he still does.”

“Sheriff Cantrell owned that house? But he wouldn’t put up with drug dealers. That doesn’t make sense.”

Ben raised his eyebrows, but kept quiet as the waiter put their salad down in front of them.

“Pizza will be out in a few minutes,” the young man said with a smile before returning to the kitchen. They were still the only customers in the place.

“Did you ever see anything shady when you were there?”

Mae shook her head. “No, just musicians. They can be a flaky group, not always the most practical people, but I never noticed anything that made me uncomfortable.” She looked down at her lap, then back up into Ben’s watchful eyes. “It just … brought back a lot of memories, being there today.”

Her fiancé was making steady inroads on his half of the salad, without taking his eyes off her. “Are you sure that house is right for the movie location, Mae?”

“I am, but there’s no reason either of us needs to spend any time there, right?” She took a bite of crisp romaine lettuce and garlic dressing, giving Ben a reassuring look.

“That’s right,” he said quietly. “We … and especially you don’t.”

Comments are closed.